Midweekers

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Midweekers

Postby Wayno » Thu Oct 18, 2007 8:09 pm

Just impressions really...

Petaluma Coonawarra 2004
A very poised and impressive bottle, reinforces my view. Not huge and not especially Coonawarra but very cabernet and fine.

Petaluma Shiraz 2005
Very spicy nose, surely a dab of viognier? Pleasant, more leftfield than classic for me, touch of funk.

Petaluma Riesling 2007
Believe the hype; classic tropical notes, awash with full bodied limey riesling characters as well. Very potent and very good.

Golding Pinot Noir 2004
Savoury, almost cool climate shiraz like. Nice, warm palated and good length. Delicious but not for the hardcore pinotphile, not currently at least.

Golding The Local Sauvignon Blanc 2007
Minerality, tropical fruits, some cut grass, good length, balanced.

Orlando St Helga Riesling 2004
Really good, limey, lemony, steeley. Full palate, length, whatnot.

La Chablisienne Chablis 2002
In nice shape, medium bodied style, some pleasing honey secondary notes.
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Postby Gustav » Thu Oct 18, 2007 9:26 pm

Wayno wrote:
Orlando St Helga Riesling 2004
Really good, limey, lemony, steeley. Full palate, length, whatnot.[/code]


I had the 2005 vintage of the St Helga two days ago. To my surprise, the expected lemon&lime was not present, especially on the nose. I got more petroleum-like aromas. I'm not experienced with the aged aromas of rieslings (I wouldn't expect that of this young wine either) so I don't really know how to interpret it. However, the freshness and structure of the wine was impeccable and I really enjoyed drinking it. Has anyone else had this vintage of St Helga?
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Postby Paullie » Thu Oct 18, 2007 11:14 pm

No, but I'm saving the few I have for later.

Heres a TN, you may have not scene, not sure.

"Orlando St. Helga Eden Valley Riesling 2005 - It's true, when it comes to Riesling I'm an EViste, and although this is not one of the great 05's it's pretty yummolicious. Light hay in colour, it has some slatey aroma's that are almost rosewatery, along with chalky lemon. When I first opened the bottle the palate was very much in the intense lime realm but has pulled back to lemon and lemon pith without losing intensity and is well balanced with river stones (slightly more flinty than slate) and has excellent length, yes it really is hanging in there. It doesn't have the acid levels to make it a real long termer, or to even give it a super-clean line now, but it is pretty good gear and excellent value at $17. 91/100. Now - 2012"
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Postby griff » Thu Oct 18, 2007 11:44 pm

Gustav wrote:Wayno wrote:
Orlando St Helga Riesling 2004
Really good, limey, lemony, steeley. Full palate, length, whatnot.[/code]


I had the 2005 vintage of the St Helga two days ago. To my surprise, the expected lemon&lime was not present, especially on the nose. I got more petroleum-like aromas. I'm not experienced with the aged aromas of rieslings (I wouldn't expect that of this young wine either) so I don't really know how to interpret it. However, the freshness and structure of the wine was impeccable and I really enjoyed drinking it. Has anyone else had this vintage of St Helga?


Some say that the kero flavours of aged Riesling is a problem with the fruit. Some pretty impressive names in that camp.

I thing I note is the distinct bottle variation involved. So even if it is the fruit, storage in my experience may affect the outcome here. Perhaps in a similar way to brett?

cheers

Carl
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Postby Wayno » Fri Oct 19, 2007 8:45 am

FWIW, no kero on this little sucker (the 04). I was pleasingly surprised at how it's developed and reckon there'd be a few years yet in it although drinking so well now, makes me wonder whether it's worth too much of a gamble.

As for my other favourite Riesling of recent note: the 02 Steingarten, that's getting on a bit now and showing no signs of kero at all for me, just slight honey and a crisp, structured palate with loads of fruit still.
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Re: Midweekers

Postby Gary W » Fri Oct 19, 2007 9:09 am

Wayno wrote:Just impressions really...

Petaluma Shiraz 2005
Very spicy nose, surely a dab of viognier? Pleasant, more leftfield than classic for me, touch of funk.



Yes. It has viognier.
GW
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Postby El Josho » Fri Oct 19, 2007 9:36 am

Interesting what you say about the St Helga. The slightly warmer weather here in Adelaide this week has put me back in a mindset where I could contemplate white wine, a cause which has been furthered by being lucky enough to be in attendance at a masterclass hosted by John Vickery (organised by a national retail chain that shall remain nameless) earlier in the week. He only did two flights, one of Richmond Grove Limited Release Rieslings (including a sublime, honeyed, viscous 1994 Barossa jobby) and a flight of Steingartens starting at 1999. There was a 2007 sitting there in a made-up label that was all fresh fruit and limes - much more forward than I was expecting for such a usually more subtle wine - that I'd be keen to get back to in five years.

I've been aiming for a AFW (and failing miserably), but my midweekers have included a 2005 Rojo Garnacha (untidy, dusty, old-worldish and lacking anything like appealing sweet fruit - ended up tipping it down the drain), 2002 Morris Blue Imperial (fresh as a daisy, soft tannins, red rolling dark berry fruit sans any real spice) and something Italian and unpronounceable that was IGT so I really don't know what it was other than gamey, red, savoury, woodless and moorish.
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Postby Jordan » Fri Oct 19, 2007 9:44 am

2001 Howard Park Cab Merlot. Typical Margaret River Cabernet blend with a wonderful core of blackberry and blackcurrant fruit framed by strong dusty tannins and assertive oak. Looking good but needs time for the tannins to soften and oak to be absorbed a little more. Very good wine.
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Re: Midweekers

Postby Wayno » Fri Oct 19, 2007 9:47 am

Gary W wrote:
Wayno wrote:Just impressions really...

Petaluma Shiraz 2005
Very spicy nose, surely a dab of viognier? Pleasant, more leftfield than classic for me, touch of funk.



Yes. It has viognier.
GW


And some.
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Postby cuttlefish » Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:15 pm

I'm really interested in Aussie riesling. I have now so much of it. My first purchase was the O'Leary Walker 04's (Watervale and Polish Hill), then I think it was Freycinet 04, and Bests Great Western 05, Seppelt 05, Petaluma 05, Knappstein Ackland 05, Richmond Grove 04, gosh, I've really bought up...but there really are so many cracking wines at great prices. More recent ones have included Hocchkirk (sure I've misspelt that), a stack of NZ ones, and lots from W.A., some Steingarten 03, some Delatite 05, Crawford River, Bellarmine (Auslese), Pity there's not more older rieslings kicking around on the secondary market, but I did get to try that Seppelt 1984 freak wine last year, which was a very nice wine. I attended the Frankland Estate International Riesling Challenge, and that was quite an eye opener to see how the European styles can show sweetness and dryness (and impeccable balance) all in the one wine. I'm hooked on Riesling, and glad to have so many affordable ones to choose from.
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